Second Sphere

Hobby Creations => Hobby => Topic started by: Wargamer on October 18, 2012, 10:23:11 am

Title: A Second Sphere Guide to Homebrew
Post by: Wargamer on October 18, 2012, 10:23:11 am
Inspired by a chat with Sotek, we both decided to compile our own "Do's and Don'ts" of creating homebrewing rules (and to an extent, background).

First, I shall begin with a bit of a disclaimer; these are personal opinions, but they are born from dealing with other people's creations. They are, to an extent, the rules we both work to when producing things.

Second, a question posed on your behalf - why should you listen to us? Well, I for one have been writing House Rules since before I actually understood how 40K really worked, so I've made all these mistakes and more. Since then, however, I've refined my talents and have thrown my hand at producing more rules than I care to recall. I've produced entire Codices, both alone and with others. Prime examples include helping out Dra'Tsuich-Novae with his Corsair Codex, or the work that is still ongoing with Sotek's Alliance of Tet Krom army lists.

In short, I've made rules. Moreover, I've played with those rules, and I've had some great games with them. So have the people I played, more importantly.

Now I'll give the floor to Sotek, and then I'll follow up with my own rules. ;)



Rainman's Cardinal Sin of Homebrewing:

The Stupid (n):


Rainman's Cardinal Rules of Homebrew:

Rainman's Cardinal Disclaimers of Homebrew:



Wargamer's Guide to House Rules:

No doubt we'll have more 'rules' of homebrew popping up, but this should be a good set to start with. If anyone else has their own rules do share with us. ;)
Title: Re: A Second Sphere Guide to Homebrew
Post by: Arguleon-veq on October 18, 2012, 10:39:00 am
Something I believe in when it comes to house rules is that if anything, you should overcost.

This mainly applies when you are adding a unit to an existing codex.  Its is not so much the unit being overcosted but instead you are paying for actually having this extra option to choose from. At the end of the day, more choices and options make for a better/more effective codex so you should pay a premium for increasing these options.

When creating a whole new codex I think the rule still applies but for different reasons. When it comes to a homebrew codex I think you should pay this premium for the fact that your using an army that people will have far less experience in playing against it and that itself is a massive advantage.
Title: Re: A Second Sphere Guide to Homebrew
Post by: Wargamer on October 18, 2012, 12:00:15 pm
Something I believe in when it comes to house rules is that if anything, you should overcost.

This mainly applies when you are adding a unit to an existing codex.  Its is not so much the unit being overcosted but instead you are paying for actually having this extra option to choose from. At the end of the day, more choices and options make for a better/more effective codex so you should pay a premium for increasing these options.

When creating a whole new codex I think the rule still applies but for different reasons. When it comes to a homebrew codex I think you should pay this premium for the fact that your using an army that people will have far less experience in playing against it and that itself is a massive advantage.
I definitely agree with that. Back in 3rd when I played the Harlequin codex from citadel journal I would stand there and tell people "the Solitaire is a character killer. He will annihilate your HQ if you let him get into combat." What invariably happened? The Solitaire was allowed to get into combat with a character, pulped him without trying, and accusations of 'omg he is broken!' are thrown out. It was only when people learned how to counter him (mass lasguns being one of the best methods used as I recall) that the complaints stopped.

So yeah, you're right about the 'power' of unfamiliarity.
Title: Re: A Second Sphere Guide to Homebrew
Post by: Arguleon-veq on October 19, 2012, 11:45:40 pm
Yep thats usually the case. I used to run CJ Harlequins too and despite them being seriously underpowered, people would complain. Its just a case of the fact that your opponent wont really pay much attention when your going through what each unit does, this will cost them.

I remember playing one of your early Eldar Corsair homebrews and finding them fair and balanced, but thats because id asked what each unit did and made sure to double check. Yet other people would complain about them being overpowered simply because they were getting into firefights/combats and not knowing what they were up against because they didnt bother to learn what they were facing.

That is something most people who do homebrews are going to have to face and because of that is why you need to overcost units.